Do things differently in 2017

5 unusual productivity hacks that get results

Each January, masses of us set the same old New Year’s resolutions for what we want to achieve and how we want to work during the months ahead. And year after year, we rely on a standard set of productivity tips and tricks to drive us on our self-improvement journey. But research by leadership development author Kevin Kruse shows that the most productive people – whether entrepreneurs, students or Olympic athletes – tend to do things differently. Making the effort to approach your work in new ways puts you in a more experimental frame of mind, so you can discover and develop more positive habits to get the most out of your days.

Instead of following the crowd, why not consider quirky or unconventional ways to kick off a productive 2017? To help you out, we asked the DropTask team how they like to do things ‘out of the box’. Here’s a round-up of their weird and wonderful advice.

1. Count to 7 – Gareth, Head of Creative Media

tip-gar
When compiling my to-dos, I try to think in ‘sevens’. There’s a very good reason that the most famous lists ever recorded consist of seven items – the 7 habits of highly effective people, the seven sins, the seven wonders of the world. It’s a good number for our brains to handle, as it’s well known that the human working memory can only hold about seven pieces of information at a time. Faced with more than that, we can become overwhelmed into inaction rather than taking action. So, for every project I’m working on, I’ll set down a maximum of seven tasks or milestones to make it appear manageable. That way I find it much easier to stay motivated towards my bigger goals, without stressing out.

2. Go mobile – Yogi, Head of Marketing

tip-yogi
Like most office workers, I spend most of my days sitting down at a desk. But long periods in my chair can cause my work rate to slow down and I become sleepy or achy. When this happens, I switch my work location by going to visit a colleague in another office or doing simple tasks on my phone or iPad while standing or moving about. At DropTask HQ we have standing desks, where you readjust your desk to a height that allows you to do your work standing up. This helps you avoid staying in one posture for too long and prevents your body and mind from getting sluggish. Worth a try if you ask me!

3. Hide your to-dos – Rowanne, Marketing Executive

tip-row
You might think it’s a good idea to leave your files and papers out on your desk, as a visible reminder of what you need to do. Or to keep your inbox and ‘work-in-progress’ documents open on your computer so you can access them quickly. But all this does is create a messy work environment – both physically and mentally – which can be an obstacle to getting stuff done. I like to take control of my workspace by tidying my desk every day and putting away my to-dos until I’m ready to work on them. And every week I take time to organize and clean out my digital stuff as well, including emails and apps. With my DropTask projects, I can stay focused on what’s relevant right now by simply Collapsing Categories, hiding any less critical errands and information. This gives me a stronger sense of control as I can avoid getting distracted while working on a high-priority task, but can quickly retrieve all my to-dos when the time is right.

4. Have a moan – Kevin, Lead Software Developer

tip-kev
I’m not saying that it’s good to be a ‘Negative Nancy’. We all know that constant complaining and whining can be detrimental in the workplace. But if there’s genuinely something that’s preventing you or others from being productive, then it’s important to raise it as an issue. For example, if you’ve got a beef about a certain procedure that’s impacting on your decision making or performance, then you should complain about it – but in a constructive way. Stay away from personal judgments about who’s to blame and focus on finding solutions for positive change. This prevents resentment building up and opens the door to discussion on new, productive action for everyone to work better together.

5. Don’t manage your time – Ben, Developer

tip-ben
There’s no denying that the modern work environment carries a high risk of burnout, what with working longer hours to combat overflowing in-trays, data being thrown at us non-stop and the immediacy of communication technologies. Often, we try to take control of these demands through time management methods that help us squeeze more into our day, cramming our calendars to the brim. The problem with this approach is that time is not renewable. However, energy is. You can’t add more hours to the day, but you can manage your energy to improve your concentration and focus to achieve important outcomes rather than mindlessly running through your tasks like a robot. My productivity plummets after a stretch of time and I get tired and foggy. For most of us, this happens after 90–120 minutes (known as our ultradian rhythms). Instead of trying to push through the slump, I break down my day into 90-minute ‘work sprints’. Following each 90-minute session, I take a break for 15–20 minutes to go for a short walk, listen to uplifting music or grab a snack. This helps to disengage my mind so I can completely refuel, before heading back refreshed for the next 90-minute work cycle.

What unusual or offbeat productivity strategies have you found effective? Share your experiences in the comments below.